Basic Documents on International Migration Law by Richard Plender

By Richard Plender

Because the e-book of the second one version of this impressive assortment, there was a endured and swift progress within the quantity overseas conventions, protocols, declarations and suggestions governing migration; and a metamorphosis of the ecu Union's the laws at the topic. the current variation takes account of those advancements. one of the new tools showing during this variation are the EU's minimal criteria Directive, its accountability Directive and the family members Union Directive, the eu conference on Nationality, a number of Conclusions of the administrative Committee of the UNHCR and Protocol No 12 to the eu conference on Human Rights. Account has been taken of the access into strength of sure of the tools which, on the time of the second one version, remained with no felony impression. leader between those is the foreign conference at the security of the Rights of All Migrant staff and participants in their households, which entered into strength on 1 July 2003 and on the finish of 2005 had 27 events. As within the moment version, the 1st 4 elements deal respectively with basic multilateral tools, texts governing nationality and statelessness, normal tools on refugees and Council of Europe tools. components 5, Six, Seven and 8, that are considerably composed of recent measures, care for features of european legislation or coverage, changing the 2 components dedicated to this topic within the moment variation, which in flip changed a unmarried bankruptcy within the first version. This e-book isn't meant for students on my own, but additionally for practitioners in migration legislation. The texts are of sensible importance for these taken with the management of the legislation affecting migration and for representatives of these stricken by those legislation. It additionally serves as a spouse to Richard Plender's monograph, "International Migration Law".

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Article 13 An alien lawfully in the territory of a State Party to the present Covenant may be expelled therefrom only in pursuance of a decision reached in accordance with law and shall, except where compelling reasons of national security otherwise require, be allowed to submit the reasons against his expulsion and to have his case reviewed by, and be represented for the purpose before, the competent authority or a person or persons especially designated by the competent authority. 7. GENERAL COMMENT ON THE POSITION OF ALIENS UNDER THE INTERNATIONAL COVENANT ON CIVIL AND POLITICAL RIGHTS, 1986 General Comment No.

113 AFGHANISTAN 1 Apr 1987 (*28(1), 30(2)), ALBANIA 11 May 1994, ALGERIA 12 Sep 1989, ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA 19 Jul 1993, ARGENTINA 24 Sep 1986, ARMENIA 13 Sep 1993, AUSTRALIA 8 Aug 1989, AUSTRIA 29 July 1987 (*5, 15), AZERBAIJAN 16 Aug 1996, BAHRAIN 6 Mar 1998 (*30(1)), BANGLADESH 5 Oct 1998 (14(1)), BELARUS 13 Mar 1987 (*20), BELGIUM 25 Jun 1999, BELIZE 17 Mar 1986, BENIN 12 Mar 1992, BOLIVIA 12 Apr 1999, BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA 1 Sep 1993, BOTSWANA 8 Sep 2000 (*1), BRAZIL 28 Sep 1989, BULGARIA 16 Dec 1986, BURKINA FASO 4 Jan 1999, BURUNDI 18 Feb 1993, CAMBODIA 15 Oct 1992, CAMEROON 19 Dec 1986, CANADA 24 Jun 1987, CAPE VERDE 4 Jun 1992, CHAD 9 Jun 1995, CHILE 30 Sep 1988 (*30(1)) CHINA 4 Oct 1988 (*20, 30), COLOMBIA 8 Dec 1987, CONGO 30 Jul 2003, CONGO (DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF) 18 MAR 1996 COSTA RICA 11 Nov 1993, COTE D’IVOIRE 18 Dec 1995, CROATIA 12 Oct 1992, CUBA 17 May 1995 (*2(1), 20(1–3), 30), CYPRUS 18 Jul 1991, CZECH REPUBLIC 22 Feb 1993, DENMARK 27 May 1987, DJIBOUTI 18 Mar 1996, ECUADOR30 Mar 1988 (*g28, 30(1)), EGYPT 25 Jun 1986, EL SALVADOR 17 Jun 1996, ESTONIA 21 Oct 1991, ETHIOPIA 14 Mar 1994, FINLAND 30 Aug 1989, FRANCE 18 Feb 1986 (*30(2)), GABON 8 Sep 2000, GEORGIA 26 Oct 1994, GERMANY 1 Oct 1990 (*3), GHANA 7 Sep 2000 (*30(2)), GREECE 6 Oct 1988, GUATEMALA 5 Jan 1980, GUINEA 10 Oct 1989, GUYANA 19 May 1988, HOLY SEE 26 Jun 2002 (*general), HONDURAS 5 Dec 1996, HUNGARY 15 Apr 1987, ICELAND 23 Oct 1996, INDONESIA 28 Oct 1998 (*20(1–3), 30(1)), IRELAND signed 28 Sep 1992, ISRAEL 3 Oct 1991 (*20, 30(2)), ITALY 12 Jan 1989, JORDAN 13 Nov 1991, KHAZAKSTAN 26 Aug 1998, KENYA 21 Feb 1997, KOREA (SOUTH) 9 Jan 1995, KUWAIT 8 Mar 1996 (*20, 30(1)), LATVIA 14 Apr 1992, LEBANON 5 Oct 2000, LESOTHO 12 Nov 2001, LIBERIA 22 Sep 2004, LIBYA 16 May 1989,LIECHTENSTEIN 2 Nov 1990, LITHUANIA 1 Feb 1996, LUXEMBOURG 29 Sep 1987 (*1(1)), MACEDONIA 12 Dec 1994, MADAGASCAR 13 Dec 2005, MALAWI 11 Jun 1996, MALDIVES 20 Apr 2004, MALI 26 Feb 1999, MALTA 13 Sep 1990, MAURITIANA 17 Nov 2004, MAURITIUS 9 Dec 1992, MEXICO 23 Jan 1986, MOLDOVA 28 Nov 1995, MONACO 6 Dec 1991 (*30), MONGOLIA 24 Jan 2002, MOROCCO 21 Jun 1993 (*20), MOZAMBIQUE 14 Sep 1999, NAMIBIA 28 Nov 1994, NEPAL 14 May 1991, NETHERLANDS 21 Dec 1988 (*1(1)), NEW ZEALAND 10 Dec 1989 (*14), NICARAGUA 5 Jul 2005, NIGER 5 Oct 1998, NIGERIA 28 Jun 2001, NORWAY 9 Jul 1986, PANAMA 24 Aug 1987 (*30(2)), PARAGUAY 12 Mar 1990, PERU 7 Jul 1988, PHILIPPINES 18 Jun 1986, POLAND 26 Jul 1989 (*20, 30), PORTUGAL 9 Feb 1989, QATAR 11 Jun 2000 (*21, 22, general concerning Islamic law), ROMANIA 18 Dec 1990, RUSSIA 3 Mar 1987, ST VINCENT & THE GRENADINES 1 Aug 2001, SAUDI ARABIA 23 Sep 1997 (*20, 30(1)), SENEGAL 21 Aug 1986, SERBIA & MONTENEGRO 12 Mar 2001, SEYCHELLES 5 May 1992, SIERRA LEONE 25 Apr 2001, SLOVAKIA 28 May 1993, SLOVENIA 16 Jul 1993, SOMALIA 24 Jan 1990, SOUTH AFRICA 10 Dec 1998 (*30), SPAIN 21 Oct 1987, SRI LANKA 3 Jan 1994, SWAZILAND 26 Mar 2004, SWEDEN 8 Jan 1986, SWITZERLAND 2 Dec 1986, SYRIA 19 Aug 2004 (*28(1), general regarding Israel), TAJIKISTAN 11 Jan 1995, TIMOR-LESTE 16 Apr 2003, TOGO 18 Nov 1987 (*general), TUNISIA 23 Sep 1988 (*20, 21), TURKEY 2 Aug 1988 (*30), TURKMENISTAN 25 Jun 1999, UGANDA 3 Nov 1986, UKRAINE 24 Feb 1987 (*20), UNITED KINGDOM 8 Dec 1988 (*general), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1 Oct 1994 (*1–16, 33 30, *general), URUGUAY 24 Oct 1986, UZBEKISTAN 28 Sep 1995, VENEZUELA 29 Jul 1991, YEMEN 5 Nov 1991, ZAMBIA 7 Oct 1998 Declarations recognising the competence of the Committee Against Torture under Article 21 (StateParty claims) and Article 22 (individual petition) are: Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Hile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Senegal, Seychelles, Serbia & Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom (21 only), United States of America (21 only), Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia Article 1 1.

Article 16 1. Each State Party shall undertake to prevent in any territory under its jurisdiction other acts of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment which do not amount to torture as defined in article I, when such acts are committed by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity. In particular, the obligations contained 36 in articles 10, 11, 12 and 13 shall apply with the substitution for references to torture of references to other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

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